Whitwick U3A logo

Whitwick & District U3A

Registered Charity No. 1181238

Thursday, 9 July 2020

Thursday, 9 Jul 2020

U3A logo

Whitwick & District U3A - Keeping in touch

Objective

This page aims to provide a brief overview of various methods by which members can keep in touch with each other, particularly as a group.

While we would have liked to recommend one specific method for use across our U3A, it seems it is very much 'horses for courses'. Only free methods are listed.

UPDATED 14-4-20

Method Available on Pros Cons Notes
Skype

Windows
MacOS
Linux
Android
iPhone
Alexa
Xbox

Up to 10 participants
Pre-installed on Windows 10
 

 

Teams Windows
MacOS
Linux
Android
iPhone
Up to 300 participants
Wide feature range including desktop sharing
May take a while to get used to all the features Installation and Meetings guides in Members Area Computing notes
Zoom Windows
MacOS
Android
iOS
Linux

Up to 100 participants

40 minutes max for group meetings

Take care to avoid gatecrashers

Serious privacy and security issues have been reported *

Good guide on zdnet.com

NEW 14-4-20 See below for precautions

Duo

Web
Android
iOS
Google Nest Hub

Up to 8 participants
Often pre-intalled on Android phones
   
Jitsi

Web
Windows
MacOS
Android
iOS
Linux

     
FaceTime

MacOS
iPhone

  Only for Apple products  
Facebook Messenger

Android
iOS
Web
Windows 10

  The usual concerns over privacy and data collection  

A Teams group has been created for members of WAD U3A. If you wish to join please email the webmaster. Installation and Meetings guides in Members Area Computing notes

* Precautions for Zoom NEW 14-4-20

Zoom has taken measures to deal with some of problems athat have been raised related to data collection, ZoomBombing and security. The following steps are recommended in using Zoom.

Password protect your meetings: The simplest way to prevent unwanted attendees and hijacking is to set a password for your meeting. Passwords can be set at the individual meeting, user, group, or account level for all sessions. In order to do so, first sign in with your account at the Zoom web portal. If you want to set up a password at the individual meeting level, head straight over to the "Settings" tab and enable "Require a password when scheduling new meetings", which will ensure a password will be generated when a meeting is scheduled. All participants require the password to join the meeting.

Authentic users: When creating a new event, you should choose to only allow signed-in users to participate.

Join before host: Do not allow others to join a meeting before you, as the host, have arrived. You can enforce this setting for a group under "Account Settings."

Lock down your meeting: Once a session has begun, head over to the "Manage Participants" tab, click "More," and choose to "lock" your meeting as soon as every expected participant has arrived. This will prevent others from joining even if meeting IDs or access details have been leaked.

Turn off participant screen sharing: No-one wants to see pornographic material shared by a Zoom bomber, and so disabling the ability for meeting attendees to share their screens is worthwhile. This option can be accessed from the new "Security" tab in active sessions.

Use a randomly-generated ID: You should not use your personal meeting ID if possible, as this could pave the way for pranksters or attackers that know it to disrupt online sessions. Instead, choose a randomly generated ID for meetings when creating a new event. In addition, you should not share your personal ID publicly.

Waiting rooms: The Waiting Room feature is a way to screen participants before they are allowed to enter a meeting. While legitimately useful for purposes including interviews or virtual office hours, this also gives hosts greater control over session security.

File sharing: Be careful with the file-sharing feature of meetings, especially if users that you don't recognize are sending content across, as it may be malicious. Instead, share material using a trusted service such as Box or Google Drive. At the time of writing, Zoom has disabled this feature anyway due to a "potential security vulnerability."

Remove nuisance attendees: If you find that someone is disrupting a meeting, you can kick them out under the "Participants" tab. Hover over the name, click "More," and remove them. You can also make sure they cannot rejoin by disabling "Allow Removed Participants to Rejoin" under the "Settings: Meetings - Basic" tab.

Check for updates: As security issues crop up and patches are deployed or functions are disabled, you should make sure you have the latest build. In order to check, open the desktop application, click on your profile in the top-right, and select "Check for updates."

If you can provide more information about the pros and cons of a method, or any installation advice, then please contact the webmaster webmaster at whitwicku3a dot org dot uk.

Please note that as an anti-spam measure e-mail addresses on this site are NOT links, but should be manually copied

Page content updated 14-4-20